Fishing forum > Beginner fly gear

Author Topic: Beginner fly gear
fishunter

Looking to learn and buy a new or used fly rod/reel combo. What should I get? I hve seen some informative youtube videos...

I'll probably be fishing for coho/pinks/steelies maybe the odd spring in the local systems, so nothing too heavy i'm guessing...

Also, I have never understood -why is fly line bright green pink or orange, don't the fish see this and get scared?
Louis Vuitton

I'd go for a medium to fast action 7/8wt rod if those are going to be your target species.

Suposedly Amundson is a decent brand, but for the money, I also prefer TFO. Honestly, I find the rod to be more important than anything, even the reel. A good drag system is important on the reel, but you can always palm it if needed, where as with the rod, you need to be able to have distance and control.

Also, for fly lines, if you're just starting out, I'd go with a WF-F, and probs get yourself a spare spool and line that up with a WF-III sink.

Get on to some fly-fishing specific forums too, that way you can start to get familiar with brands, lingo, and tips/techniques.

Once you get into single-handing, like me, you'll be tempted to go switch or spey...if only I had the money for it!
Louis Vuitton

There actually are some good deals on Craigslist, but from new, I would be looking at aorund $175-$200 for the rod, and anywhere from $75+ for the real. There actually are some decent reels out there that won't break the bank and can still hold their own. I know a lot of people want to go all-out with new gear, and drop the money on Sage and Orvis and G. Loomis, but there really isn't a need to. Granted, they got their reputation for being great companies because they do make great product, but I honestly do not see the reason as to why people in their right mind pay $500 and up for a rod. That's just silly. Temple Fork Outfitters makes great stuff, have an amazing pro-staff (many of which have made the transition over from a lot of the many big name companies), and they have a great warranty system.
Also, don't take my word on this cause I was the one originally asking, but supposedly Amundson makes good stuff at a decent price (though, for me, they are priced at the same level as TFO pretty much, and I'd rather go with a brand I know for sure...), and Fenwick makes some decent rods at entry level prices, as does Sage (the Flight series). But be reminded, that rods that are in the higher weight class (7 and up) usually cost more due to the fact that the components and pieces are different: anodized reel seats, stainless guides, a fighting butt, etc. Most heavier rods are built with these because they usually see some saltwater use. The lighter weights, 6weight and down, are usually used only in the fresh and are therefor not built the same way. This applies for reels as well.

Echo and TFO are great options for quality rods at entry level prices.

Lines are a whole other thing. Get on some forums, start researching. If you are going to be specifically focused on salmon in the salt/rivers, research that stuff. Read articles and stories. That way they will be focused on those fish and the subject matter will reflect.

Research, get geared up, start practicing in a field
Louis Vuitton

There actually are some good deals on Craigslist, but from new, I would be looking at aorund $175-$200 for the rod, and anywhere from $75+ for the real. There actually are some decent reels out there that won't break the bank and can still hold their own. I know a lot of people want to go all-out with new gear, and drop the money on Sage and Orvis and G. Loomis, but there really isn't a need to. Granted, they got their reputation for being great companies because they do make great product, but I honestly do not see the reason as to why people in their right mind pay $500 and up for a rod. That's just silly. Temple Fork Outfitters makes great stuff, have an amazing pro-staff (many of which have made the transition over from a lot of the many big name companies), and they have a great warranty system.
Also, don't take my word on this cause I was the one originally asking, but supposedly Amundson makes good stuff at a decent price (though, for me, they are priced at the same level as TFO pretty much, and I'd rather go with a brand I know for sure...), and Fenwick makes some decent rods at entry level prices, as does Sage (the Flight series). But be reminded, that rods that are in the higher weight class (7 and up) usually cost more due to the fact that the components and pieces are different: anodized reel seats, stainless guides, a fighting butt, etc. Most heavier rods are built with these because they usually see some saltwater use. The lighter weights, 6weight and down, are usually used only in the fresh and are therefor not built the same way. This applies for reels as well.

Echo and TFO are great options for quality rods at entry level prices.

Lines are a whole other thing. Get on some forums, start researching. If you are going to be specifically focused on salmon in the salt/rivers, research that stuff. Read articles and stories. That way they will be focused on those fish and the subject matter will reflect.

Research, get geared up, start practicing in a field, and then come July/August, hit the beaches!
Louis Vuitton

If you can afford it, and research it a bit, I would maybe look into a Switch rod (a bit more pricey), and learn single hand and switch casting styles.
If not, go for a single hand, and for lines, look into shooting head set ups. You'll find them a bit tricky to learn to cast at first due to how the rod will load, and what the minimum line length to have out of the tip is, but you'll find that getting distance is much easier, especially if you can learn to double-haul cast it. For rivers, distance isn't too crucial, but when on the beaches, sometimes that extra reach is the ticket...
fishunter

yeah, you're probably right. and since its pink season I probably will be hitting the beaches - whether or not pinks ike flies, TBD lol. I think i'll get my rod next paycheque and start practicing in a field

thanks
cagey

pinks love pink flies. just tie a bushy pink marabou fly with a bit if chrystal flash. fish with a sinking line.
a few years ago i landed 20 in one day on the harrison. they got the last laugh as i broke my rod horsing the 21st in!
Louis Vuitton

Honestly, if I could just go out and drop money on a rod, it would be a TFO Deer Creek swtich rod in 7/8wt.

Either that or an Echo switch. Also, when shopping for a reel, try to find the one in your price range, but make sure it's balanced (more important on a spey rod, but will help on a switch) in weight. I don't mean 7/8 reel for 7/8 rod, but in actual ounces. This can make a world of difference when switch/spey casting.

If you're just going with a single-handed rod, then don't worry too much about it.
Louis Vuitton

Not sure where you live, but Pacific Angler has a sale on right now...

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