Fishing forum > What is this?

Author Topic: What is this?
super_snagger


Caught this in Pitt Lake last week!
WTF is it?
it was 6" long 4"deep.
My guess is some ass-hat released a tropical pet fish in the lake or river and it grew that big.
shizzyisback

,,no doubt..never seen that b4...?...u release it ..?...send the pic to the dfo..they could answer that most likeley..coo0l lookin lil bugger ragaurdless...
clownfish

It looks as though it is a pumpkinseed fish. I didn't find any reference to them being native to BC, so it looks like the "bucket brigade" has decided to branch out into other species besides bass. Here is a link to a web page with a couple of pictures and other info http://seagrant.wisc.edu/greatlakesfish/fpumpkinseed.html
.
If you want to make a report on this you can do so online at http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/cos/rapp/form.htm .
clownfish

Found a bit more about this, definitely looks like it is an "invasive" (illegally introduced) species.
http://www.canadian-sportfishing.com/tips_view.php?id=58
The picture on the web page from the link above is of poor quality, doesn't show the colours.
bcbasser

it is a pumkinseed sunfish which may not be native but have been here a long time and arent hurting anything
Crawdaddy

spoken like a true moron. BCbasser are you a marine ecologist? Invasive species expert? Nope, just an asshat bass fisher that probly thinks bass aren't doing any damage either. If they're not native fish, they shouldn't be here. The bucket brigade should be strung up and shot.
clownfish

Crawdaddy, I couldn't agree more! If the morons would check the info contained on sites like the two I listed, they would see that these fish are predatory, they compete with and predate upon our native species of fish and their food sources. These fish reproduce rapidly and are low on the food chain. They eat a variety of insects, including mosquito larvae, along with small molluscs and crustaceans. They also feed on smaller fish, including smaller pumpkinseeds, as well as the eggs of other fish.

I, and people that know far more about this than myself, have posted numerous times on several websites about this topic, and the idiots still say there is nothing wrong with this.

Due to the actions of similarly mentally retarded individuals this species is causing havoc in the UK. http://archive.theargus.co.uk/2005/2/3/105721.html

So yeah, strung up, shot, stabbed, and pissed on.
Sergey2

It's a sunfish.
Lots of them in ontario. They don't taste too good, they don't grow large, and are mostly caught near the shore. I don't see why anyone would want to introduce them to the lower mainland. That being said, if there is a new fish species in a lake, it doesn't mean that the "bucket brigade" put them there. I think fish roe can get transported by birds, underground channels, and floods.
I'm also pretty sure i've caught a couple at albert dyck park or mill lake. don't remember.
clownfish

Yes, it is a member of the sunfish family. The sunfishes are a family (Centrarchidae) of freshwater ray-finned fish belonging to the order Perciformes. The type genus is Centrarchus (consisting solely of the flier, C. macropterus). The family's 27 species includes many fishes familiar to North Americans, including the black basses, rock bass, largemouth bass, bluegill, and crappies. All are native only to North America. Once again, if you looked at the links that I have posted, this would have been obvious.

"I think fish roe can get transported by birds, underground channels, and floods." And probably by Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy as well. I'm sure that there must be underground channels connecting Pitt Lake with the Columbia watershed, and Vancouver Island. Does anyone else remember a flood between either of those areas and Pitt lake? Or maybe they are flying sunfish. If so then their fins must be awful tired from the flight. And how do you think that they got into Mill Lake or Albert Dyck?

Sergey2

I'm just saying, it doesn't make sense that someone would introduce them on purpose.

If you dig a lake somewhere, and not put any fish in it, it will still have fish in it eventually.
clownfish

"I'm just saying, it doesn't make sense that someone would introduce them on purpose.

If you dig a lake somewhere, and not put any fish in it, it will still have fish in it eventually."

Only if the fish walk or fly by themselves, or spontaneous generation, OR, the only way short of divine intervention, by someone putting them there. Either you are extremely naive or you truly believe what you said, in either case, I have a couple of bridges I would like to sell to you!

The "bucket brigade" does this because they don't care about what kind of damage they do to the environment, or maybe they believe they know more than the fisheries biologists , they just want to fish for their "favorite" species, and damn everyone else.

Well, should I catch any of these fish, I'll be making sure that they don't survive the experiance, and if I ever witness anyone illegally transporting and releasing fish, even native species, I will be sure to make a thorough report to the authorities! Our native species, particularly salmon, are having a tough enough time as it is, they don't need another species that preys on their fry, competes for their food, and likely is carrying parasites/diseases that they have no natural defense against!
Sergey2

Don't get me wrong. I'm against introduction of foreign species, be it fish, insects, or plants.

Now, since you called me naive or stupid, here's my question to you: If a duck swims in a lake, is it possible for some roe to get trapped somewhere in it's feathers, or feet?

Another question: It's understandable why people want to fish for bass and perch. Why would anyone want to fish for sunfish?
Sergey2

ok, I've done a little bit of research, and wasn't able to find anything about fish eggs being transported by birds. In fact, most people say it's unlikely, but I haven't found a definite answer from anyone knowledgeable in the field.

I still think that a fishless lake or pond will have fish in it in a couple of years. I cannot prove it, but it's just my opinion, you don't have to agree. Maybe someone else out there has some interesting facts??

Oh, and check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking_fish
clownfish

Sergey2 wrote in the previous two posts:
"Now, since you called me naive or stupid, here's my question to you: If a duck swims in a lake, is it possible for some roe to get trapped somewhere in it's feathers, or feet?"

"ok, I've done a little bit of research, and wasn't able to find anything about fish eggs being transported by birds. In fact, most people say it's unlikely, but I haven't found a definite answer from anyone knowledgeable in the field."

As most fish cannot survive for long out of water (a minute or so at the most), how long do you think their eggs can do the same? I don't think your research was very thorough. I don't, normally, consider naive to be the same as stupid.

Sergey2 also wrote:
"Another question: It's understandable why people want to fish for bass and perch. Why would anyone want to fish for sunfish?"

Once again I don't think your research was very thorough. If you read the info on the couple of pages I posted links to, and looked at any other sites about these fish, you would have read that they tend to be found near the shoreline, in relatively shallow water, and near docks, they don't get very large, and will bite on almost any bait or small lure, making them a good target species for anglers that do not have ready access to a boat and they don't require a large investment in heavy/expensive gear. For example: (copied from http://www.canadian-sportfishing.com/tips_view.php?id=58 )
Since the sunfish clan is constantly on the alert for a snack, the angler can enjoy good fishing using almost any method known. Although not known for their ferocity, sunfish will usually pursue anything that doesn't actually frighten them. They will snap up almost any natural bait, including worms, grasshoppers, mayfly nymphs, crickets, leeches, mealworms and minnows. Care should be taken to use small baits with light hooks, lines, and sensitive bobbers. Lures, too, should always be very small and light and will often out produce live baits. This is especially true when sunfish are guarding their nests.

Sergey2 also wrote:
"I still think that a fishless lake or pond will have fish in it in a couple of years. I cannot prove it, but it's just my opinion, you don't have to agree. Maybe someone else out there has some interesting facts??"

Yeah, but there is a world of difference between opinion and fact. There were an awful lot of people who held the opinion that powered flight (IE. airplanes), or sending people to space and the moon, was impossible, and that the Earth was the centre of the universe. So I really don't consider opinions as having any relation to reality. The main problem with most peoples' opinions is that they base them on assumptions, or more often no information at all, instead of facts.

Sergey2 also wrote:
"Oh, and check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking_fish "

And your point is? That fish could not survive long enough to "walk" all the way from the Columbia River basin. I've heard of mud skippers years ago, how about this one http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking_catfish . Another good example of an invasive species, and why importation of any species of fish, bird, reptile/amphibian, mammal, or whatever, should be forbidden until the impact of "escapes" has been fully evaluated, and why those responsible for an "escape" should be held accountable, and immediate measures be taken to correct the situation.





fisher 696

Opinions are like assholes.....everybody has one.
Crawdaddy

Yes opinions are like assholes. Some stink, and some are shittier than others. I'd like to think I base my opinion on fact. Clownfish seems to be the only one using facts to come to a conclusion here. The bucket brigade have proven themselves to be unconcerned with the environmental impact they cause. Why wouldn't they introduce this species? I cannot prove they are responsible for this but I think, looking at the facts, they are more likely the origin of this than say, eggs stuck in feathers for a flight across Canada(though there have been reports of fish eggs sticking to the legs and feet of cranes and remaining viable for short periods, I think cross Canada may be more than a short period?), a fish walking across Canada or an underground tunnel that thay happened to swim across Canada through. Logic seems to be shy in this debate.
super_snagger

Sorry for causing such a shit-storm.Now I know what the fish was.Thanks for all your input.
clownfish

super_snagger wrote:
"Sorry for causing such a shit-storm.Now I know what the fish was.Thanks for all your input."

No problem s_s, I'm glad I was able to help.

Do you mind if I ask where exactly you caught it and what with? If it could be established where they currently are, how long they have been around, and how far they have spread, it might be possible to wipe them out or at least limit their spreading till some plan to control or eradicate them could be developed. As they are not listed as a native species for this fisheries region there is no size or quantity limits on them, so we can kill as many as we can catch. Anyone else in on this?
Dutchy

Here in The Netherlands the are called sunbass(rough translation).
They're very succesful species, once you got one of each sex, you've got a thousend of them. I have actiually got one in my Koi pond against leaches and other harmful insects for my koi.
In some of our fishingwater they have also been released by unknowing people and now we are loosing several other species.
They are near impossible to eridicate but if you want to catch as much as possible.
On sunny days on about 10-50cm in depth close to vegetation with maggots or small worms. easy. The one in the picture with a red dot on the cheek is a male(I think).
I did not want to demorolize to much, maybe you have more succesful hunting fish in your waters that win from them?
ion

This is a pest! I'v seen lakes infested and at evening time the surface is like boiling. Walley get them, I don't know about trout. For bottom fishing walley, they are an excellent bait but you have to clip their dorsal fin
el-nino2010


well this not good news. pitt lake is huge deep and cold but as you can see by the pic..too many places where it can survive. i saw a school of maybe 20 of these go by the dock in mill lake a few years back. as the other member said..they flourish wherever they are introduced. it should be reported to fisheries as soon as possible for them to assess.
kenyo

TRAGIC.



Soon the fish farms will contaminate all the west coast with sea lice... the inland body waters will be infested with exotic fish... current anglers hurt some of the surviving species.

In 20 years, we would be only able to eat processed fish meat made out of bass, the above mentioned fish, tilapia, pork and red meat.



I'm starting to have second thoughts everytime I take my fishing gear.
Dinkycum

Bluegill.

http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/fish/bluegill.jpg


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